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SeVissa Young urban Women's Charter Conference 2016

SeVissa Young urban Women's Charter Conference 2016

ActionAid South Africa’s Women’s Rights Coordinator – Michelle Festus says she is inspired by the 264 girls from 12 schools in Gauteng and Limpopo, who came together this week to develop a Girls Club Charter. “Through song, dance and poetry, the girls told their stories of violence and pain, but more importantly, they displayed their courage and vision for schools free of violence. We were all deeply touched when they shared their experiences of peer pressure, teenage pregnancy, bullying, rape and incest. Many girls continue to live with trauma and their stories remain untold. The SeVISSA project and this conference provide a safe space for girls to share their experiences, and to be held in love and supported by their peers, educators and the partner organisations.” The conference forms part of the SeVISSA project aimed at ending sexual violence against girls in schools. The project is funded by Comic Relief and implemented by AASA’s partners- Teddy Bear Clinic, TVEP and Xihlobo Xa Ndivho
ActionAid South Africa launches Precious Metals 2-A Systemic Inequality

ActionAid South Africa launches Precious Metals 2-A Systemic Inequality

AASA launched ‪#‎PreciousMetals2‬– A Systemic Inequality on the 27th June 216. The report looks at the structural nature of the inequality experienced by the communities of Mapela in Mokopane and the manner in which the legislative regime governing the mining industry systemically violates the human rights of communities like Mapela. Matthew Chadwick, Head of Sustainability – Anglo Platinum said they welcomed the report and pledged to address the issues raised.

The report launch was followed by a screening of ‘Black Lives Matter’ – a controversial documentary produced by acclaimed filmmaker Joseph Oesi, which investigates many of the issues detailed in Precious Metals II. Mokete Khoda, a community activist who features in Oesi’s film said, “The Precious Metals report is devastating. Also, to think that in 2008, the SAHRC said they would monitor the case, but they failed to do so.Everyone makes promises, but Anglo refused to accept our memorandum in April.” AASA hopes that in seeking to bring the findings into focus, we will have contributed to the necessary and urgent realignment of our mining regime, with the clear framework of South Africa’s Constitution. We trust that this report will result in a much wider and democratic debate, which must include affected communities, the Department of Mineral Resources, legislators, business, as well as the relevant constitutionally mandated human rights Institutions.

Read the report here: http://www.actionaid.org/…/precious-metals-ii-systemic-ineq…